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5 Components of Emotional Intelligence Skill & How to Use Them

The ability to sense, control, and assess emotions is referred to as emotional intelligence (EI). Some academics believe emotional intelligence can be taught and improved, while others believe it is a natural trait.
 

It's important to be able to express and control emotions, but it's also important to be able to understand, interpret, and respond to the emotions of others. Consider a world in which you couldn't tell when a friend was unhappy or when a coworker was upset. Emotional intelligence is a term used by psychologists to describe this capacity, and some experts believe it is more significant than IQ in terms of overall life success.
 

Below are a framework of five elements that define emotional intelligence:
 

  1. Self-Awareness - It's important to be able to express and control emotions, but it's also important to be able to understand, interpret, and respond to the emotions of others. Consider a world in which you couldn't tell when a friend was unhappy or when a co-worker was upset. Emotional intelligence is a term used by psychologists to describe this capacity, and some experts believe it is more significant than IQ in terms of overall life success.
  2. Self-Regulation - It's important to be able to express and control emotions, but it's also important to be able to understand, interpret, and respond to the emotions of others. Consider a world in which you couldn't tell when a friend was unhappy or when a co-worker was upset. Emotional intelligence is a term used by psychologists to describe this capacity, and some experts believe it is more significant than IQ in terms of overall life success.
  3. Motivation– Motivated people frequently have a high level of emotional intelligence. They're willing to put off instant gratification in order to achieve long-term success. They're extremely productive, enjoy a good challenge, and are really effective at what they do.
  4. Empathy– Empathy is the ability to identify with and comprehend the desires, needs, and perspectives of another. People that have empathy are skilled at recognising other people's sentiments, even if they aren't visible. Empathetic people are frequently good at managing relationships, listening, and relating to others as a result of this. They reject stereotypes and fast judgments, and they live their life in an open and honest manner.
  5. Social Skills– Another sign of high emotional intelligence is that people with good social skills are usually easy to talk to and like. Team players are usually those who have great social abilities. Rather than focusing on their own accomplishment, they assist others in growing and shining. They are skilled at resolving conflicts, communicating effectively, and creating and maintaining relationships.
     

Sir Richard Branson, a billionaire entrepreneur, adventurer, campaigner, and business celebrity, has founded dozens of firms worth billions of dollars. Even though he was a dyslexic school dropout, he was able to do all of this. 

Branson is not ashamed to admit that he struggled with dyslexia as a child. He believes that young people need more support to see dyslexia as a "different and amazing way of thinking." Made By Dyslexia, an organization dedicated to eradicating the stigma around dyslexia, is one of his biggest supporters.
 

Just recently, Branson published a letter to his younger dyslexic self on his blog:

Dear Ricky, I know you’re struggling at school and I wanted to give you some advice on how to become the best you can be, even when it’s difficult and you feel like the world is against you… I know you have problems with reading, writing, and spelling and sometimes find it tricky to keep up in class. This does not mean you are lazy or dumb. You just think in a more creative way and struggle to find the relevance in school. Just make sure you turn your frustration with education into something positive. Find things that interest you and pursue them doggedly. This passion is what will keep you going when things get tough — and life is always full of challenges. Your alternative ways of thinking will help you see these challenges as opportunities…
 

Branson's post taps into all five components of emotional intelligence: he's self-aware and admits dyslexia has been a weakness (and a strength), he writes about coping with a condition outside of his control, he shows that dyslexia was a motivation for his success, he displays empathy for young people who also have the condition, and he communicates his point — his sincere letter to himself and, you could say, other dyslexics — in a caring and meaningful way.

 

As long as we are interacting with humans in whatever function, Emotional Intelligence is an absolute must in today's competitive workplace. EI is a determinant in personal and professional success, and unlike IQ, it allows for 'Continuous Improvement,' assisting you in achieving your goals.
 

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